New section for this forum.

How to's when detailing your Thunderbird
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redbird1
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New section for this forum.

Post by redbird1 » Wed Jun 05, 2013 7:22 pm

I think a section on detailing would be extremely helpful to all visiting this forum.
There is a wide variety of products out there, and it would be nice to hear from others about products and processes they use when detailing their car.
As an example, recently I decided to claybar my 66.
The kit was about thirty dollars.
I already had the basics for the job, and spending thirty bucks for just a clay bar seemed stupid.
I found out that good ole plumber's putty is the same as a clay bar, and does the same job.
As I said, the clay bar kit is $30.00, and the plumber's putty is $2.49.
I will put the finish on my 66 up against anything on the road

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Bob.
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RAVEN
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Post by RAVEN » Wed Jun 05, 2013 8:04 pm

You have to admit that is a nice shine!!!!!!!!! OK so when you doin mine?

scumdog
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Post by scumdog » Wed Jun 05, 2013 8:36 pm

Plumbers putty? - the only putty we seem to have here is glaziers putty whick is pretty soft and full of linseed oil...

Can you tell me more about 'plumbers putty' - like brand name, intended use etc?
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redbird1
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Post by redbird1 » Wed Jun 05, 2013 8:50 pm

scumdog wrote:Plumbers putty? - the only putty we seem to have here is glaziers putty whick is pretty soft and full of linseed oil...

Can you tell me more about 'plumbers putty' - like brand name, intended use etc?
The putty is Plumber's putty which is different from glazier's putty.
Glazier's putty contains a great deal of linseed oil, which is why it is not as stiff as plumber's putty.
I got it at home depot, but any home improvement or hardware store will have it.
The brand name doesn't much matter, though the brand I have is Harvey's.
It is for sealing plumbing fixtures in a sink, like faucets, and drains.
The label states that in some cases it may cause irritation to the skin, but that didn't happen with me.
I found it to be a very good alternative to an expensive clay bar kit.
The results speak for themself
Bob.
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redbird1
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Post by redbird1 » Wed Jun 05, 2013 8:58 pm

RAVEN wrote:You have to admit that is a nice shine!!!!!!!!! OK so when you doin mine?
When ever you are ready.
Of course, if you aren't in the SoCal area, you will have to add air fare, and hotel to the outlandish price I will be charging you.
In another week or so, I will be doing my Dakota pickup with the putty.
Can't wait to see the finish because it is black.
If it comes out close to how the tbird did, I will be very pleased.

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Bob.
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Alan H. Tast
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Re: New section for this forum.

Post by Alan H. Tast » Wed Jun 05, 2013 10:15 pm

redbird1 wrote:I think a section on detailing would be extremely helpful to all visiting this forum.
There is a wide variety of products out there, and it would be nice to hear from others about products and processes they use when detailing their car.
Bob.
I've been watching the detailing section that Bob has been also posting in on The Lincoln Forum, and I have to agree that a separate section for something as generic as this probably would help in allowing many of us to focus on our favorite tips and tricks for working on 'Birds rather than clutter up the General Discussion section or get lost in the generation-specific ones. Good suggestion, Bob.
Alan H. Tast, AIA
Technical Director/Past President,
Vintage Thunderbird Club Int'l.
Author, "Thunderbird 1955-1966" & "Thunderbird 50 Years"
1963 Hardtop & 1963 Sports Roadster

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Ozzy351
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Post by Ozzy351 » Wed Jun 05, 2013 10:28 pm

Found this info on Plumbers Putty. The interesting bit from the info supplied is quoted below.

Different brands of plumber's putty often contain different ingredients. Many products make use of some type of clay as a base ingredient. Linseed oil is also a common additive. Other formulas include limestone, a blend of fish oils, or talc.

http://www.wisegeek.org/what-is-plumbers-putty.htm

Ozzy :smile:
"The sour memory of a dud purchase is remembered long after the sweet taste of a cheap deal has disappeared"
1961 T-bird H/T Silver-Gray Metallic/Raven Black roof.
1971 Ford Falcon 351 XYGT-Nugget Gold.
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redbird1
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Post by redbird1 » Wed Jun 05, 2013 11:43 pm

I read the label on the one I used, and it contains two types of oil, plus silica.
I think it may be the silica that is why it did such a great job of picking up all the tiny contaminates on the finish, leaving it as smooth as glass.
When I finished using the putty (before applying wax) I felt no grit or particles of any kind on the finish.
I think the key to a good job is keeping the finish lubed while claying.
Any way, I am very happy with the results, and now the pickup is next.
Bob.
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Wklink
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Post by Wklink » Thu Jun 06, 2013 7:36 am

It looks good. I'm not totally sure I would want to trust my 10K paint job to a 2 dollar container of putty from the the hardware store but it is a nice option. I have a clay bar from Griots already so I will go with that but thanks for the tip.

It wouldn't be a bad idea for tips if you could put a sub division under the General T-bird section.
Thomas Cofield
1962 Hardtop, 'Thumper' Red/Black
1962 Hardtop, 'The Survivor' White/Red
VTCI-PNW
RSSVTCI

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pops
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Post by pops » Fri Jun 07, 2013 3:43 pm

redbird1,

How about sharing your procedure used with the plumbers putty to get that beautiful finish?

PS. I too think a detail section would be agreat addition to the forum.

tbird
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Post by tbird » Fri Jun 07, 2013 10:51 pm

The new section has been created yesterday just go down the forum 2 headings in the same section as this is posted.
Jim Mills
VTCI # 8071
VTCI 1964-66 Technical Editor
2002 Thunderbird
1965 Convertible
1962 Convertible (in progress)
1959 Ford Retractable HT
Many parts cars

redbird1
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Post by redbird1 » Sat Jun 08, 2013 12:33 am

pops wrote:redbird1,

How about sharing your procedure used with the plumbers putty to get that beautiful finish?

PS. I too think a detail section would be agreat addition to the forum.
To begin, I am a strong advocate of never using soap to wash a vehicle, because it strips the wax off the finish.
Stripping the wax of the existing finish is necessary before using a clay bar, or the plumber's putty I chose.
I used dawn blue dishwashing liquid to wash the car.
After the car was dried, I gathered the soft towels, the Meguiar's ultimate detail in the spray bottle, and the turtle wax I would use as the final coat of wax.
Doing roughly a 3' area at a time, I sprayed a light coat of the detail spray (I think one could use others, but this is a great lubricant for the clay bar, or putty) then form the putty to about a 3 or 4"x1,4" pad in the palm of your hand.
Rub vigorously, but make sure to use the lubricant often.
Don't let the surface you are rubbing dry out.
As you rub the finish, occasionally re-form the putty in your hand, and while doing so, you will see the crud the putty is removing from the finish.
These are the contaminants the soap could not remove.
These are embedded in the finish, and the putty is what will remove them.
After a section is clayed, buff it with a soft towel, or rag.
Move on to the next section to be clayed.
After you have the car completely clayed, run your fingers across the finish.
It will be smoother than glass.
Now, it's time for the coat of wax.
Again, do about 3 or 4 feet at a time.
After the waxing is done, stand back and enjoy.
One note, if by chance you drop the putty for whatever reason, throw it away, and start with a new piece.
Bob.
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Terri McNeill
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Post by Terri McNeill » Sat Jun 08, 2013 2:26 pm

Hi Guys... the new section is there... :smile: I moved this thread to the Detailing section
Terri McNeill, Past VTCI President, currently VTCI Publications Director, Member of VTCI, VTCI-PNWC and Chicagoland Thunderbirds

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