Heater always hot

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RAVEN
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Re: Heater always hot

Post by RAVEN » Mon Sep 10, 2018 8:36 am

Skip, you may be confusing "Control Head" with Temp Reg Valve or Heater hose Water Valve.
Maybe I missed in previous posts what is your car's configuration. Do you have A/C or just a standard heater? What is your specific problem with your car to narrow the problem?
There have been numerous posts on this topic recently (hot air, temp control, vac issues, etc) and some confusion may exist.
CDN Member since 1975 #2086
Flock: 1964 Landau Original Family Owned
1964 Sr Convertible "RAVEN"
Past: 2003 Blk Lab "RAVEN" "RIP"Nov 15/17
1964 Lincoln vin4Y86N00007
1964 Red Convertible

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paulr
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Re: Heater always hot

Post by paulr » Mon Sep 10, 2018 1:48 pm

66T-Bird wrote:
Sun Sep 09, 2018 6:44 pm
what does Control Head exactly mean in this feed i'am lost
Your console heater-A/C control levers are operating this here thing:
photo 2 (8).jpg
In some cars, like mine, this thing gets dirty and requires cleaning. It's got internal passages that are hair thin; tiny bits of dust block your vacuum passages. It's a delicate procedure. Hopefully, yours is ok.
Paul
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Registry 45122
'64 Landau
"Beer, now there's a temporary solution!" ~Homer Simpson

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sseebart
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Re: Heater always hot

Post by sseebart » Wed Sep 19, 2018 11:58 am

paulr wrote:
Sun Apr 20, 2014 10:30 pm
Would running without a thermostat cause this effect?
I think this is possible. On some cars at least, a lack of a thermostat would allow coolant to flow through the radiator too quickly, so once up to temp, it would run too hot. I suspect that if this were the case, engine overheating would be a bigger problem than extra heat in the cabin.

~Steve

Terry64HT
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Re: Heater always hot

Post by Terry64HT » Wed Sep 19, 2018 1:18 pm

Steve, when I was a kid I can remember my father taking the thermostat out during the summer so the engine would run cooler. The thermostat opens and closes at the preset temperature to hold the engine at a relatively constant temperature. I assume that this is ongoing, opening and closing to keep the temp in the right range. It would seem that, in general, the cooling capacity of the rad (in a properly operating system) would be greater than the heat generating capacity of the engine. Otherwise, the temperature would just keep going up. With no thermostat, the engine would probably never reach proper operating temperature.
My thoughts
Terry
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sseebart
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Re: Heater always hot

Post by sseebart » Wed Sep 19, 2018 2:37 pm

Terry, when I was much younger I had a '71 BMW 2002. It always seemed to run hot, so I bypassed the thermostat (an oddball thing that actually fit into the upper radiator hose). As you mention, it never got up to operating temperature after that--a feature I failed to consider when I drove it to Montana one year in the dead of winter. (Soda cans in the back seat literally froze during the drive!)

In relating this story over the decades, quite a few folks have mentioned experiencing the opposite effect--engine overheating with the thermostat removed. I imagine that the outcome is dependent on the design of the car. I haven't tried running the 390 without a thermostat, so can't speak directly to Paul's issue, but as I mentioned before, a too-hot heater would probably be the least of his concerns if this were the case.

~Steve

David Langhorne
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Re: Heater always hot

Post by David Langhorne » Wed Sep 19, 2018 5:56 pm

paulr wrote: ↑
Mon Apr 21, 2014 2:30 am
Would running without a thermostat cause this effect?

I think this is possible. On some cars at least, a lack of a thermostat would allow coolant to flow through the radiator too quickly, so once up to temp, it would run too hot. I suspect that if this were the case, engine overheating would be a bigger problem than extra heat in the cabin.
Steve - if the water is spending less time in the radiator losing heat then I would presume it is also spending less time in the engine gaining heat?
Dave Langhorne 65SL
UK

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paulr
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Re: Heater always hot

Post by paulr » Wed Sep 19, 2018 8:06 pm

sseebart wrote:
Wed Sep 19, 2018 2:37 pm
Terry, when I was much younger I had a '71 BMW 2002...

...directly to Paul's issue, but as I mentioned before, a too-hot heater would probably be the least of his concerns if this were the case.

~Steve
Steve, the always-hot heater condition my Bird had was due to temperature regulator valve/vacuum related matters, it turned out.

My '82 530i always ran hot (didn't they all?) which never concerned me in Wisconsin (in those days) winter. In summer, however? I joined a local club and got schooled that I was driving too slow. True, that. The car always seemed most solid at 80 mph+.
Miss that thing. Too many tickets.
Paul
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'64 Landau
"Beer, now there's a temporary solution!" ~Homer Simpson

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sseebart
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Re: Heater always hot

Post by sseebart » Wed Sep 19, 2018 9:28 pm

David Langhorne wrote:
Wed Sep 19, 2018 5:56 pm
paulr wrote: ↑
Mon Apr 21, 2014 2:30 am
Would running without a thermostat cause this effect?

I think this is possible. On some cars at least, a lack of a thermostat would allow coolant to flow through the radiator too quickly, so once up to temp, it would run too hot. I suspect that if this were the case, engine overheating would be a bigger problem than extra heat in the cabin.
by

Steve - if the water is spending less time in the radiator losing heat then I would presume it is also spending less time in the engine gaining heat?
I'm no expert, but perhaps. That would mean poor heat transfer with the majority of the heat trapped in the block and heads, no?

In any case, I can only report the anecdotal evidence I heard. Based on this thread, it sounds like there's no real consensus: https://www.garagejournal.com/forum/sho ... hp?t=32411

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